Movie Review – Front Cover (2015)

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Movie Synopsis:

A gay fashion stylist who is still trying to figure out his place as a gay person and a Chinese-American living in New York City is told to work with a famous actor from China, who is in town to do some filming. As he spends more time with this man, they begin to grow very close, despite their differences, and they end up both going on journeys of self reflection and discovery.

Movie Review:

This independent film which won several awards at film festivals definitely has charm, intelligence, and grace, as it explores numerous subjects. The sensitivity with which Director and Writer Ray Yeung covers two men exploring their sexuality, their culture, and their developing feelings for each other is truly successful.

Main actors Jake Choi and James Chen also do a nice job playing Chinese men who both have challenges when it comes to really understanding who they are and how they can live comfortably in the world they inhabit. As they explore these questions together, the audience is treated to both humour and tenderness, and the film is definitely successful in this way.

The scene where the two characters spend time with Ryan’s parents, who also live in New York City, is truly an example of well executed comedy, and everyone can relate to this scene to some level, although certainly not to the extent that Ryan has to, given his situation. The audience was laughing throughout the opening of this extended scene, yet later there were tears flowing when the scene evolved to the touching one it became involving the older generation. This showcases the success of the directing, acting, and writing.

Overall, the film also succeeded for having a very practical ending as well, one that was believable and was not a perfect, happy ending, but one where everyone still made decisions and learned something.

This was definitely a fascinating and enjoyable film, looking at two Chinese men and their understanding of their own sexualities and cultures. The diversity of the film, and the focus on characters who were not straight white males, was definitely to be celebrated.

Well Done!

Overall: 5 stars out of 5 stars.

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