Book Review – The Space Merchants – Frederik Pohl and C.M. Kornbluth

space_merchants

Facts:

Book: The Space Merchants
Author: Frederik Pohl and C.M. Kornbluth
Genre: Science Fiction
Year of Release: 1952
Read 154-page hardcover edition in March 2017.

Book Description:

In this classic dystopian science fiction novel, we are treated to a troubled world, where society’s masses are controlled by the whims of corporations and their sharp marketing plans. It has become easy to get the majority of the population to mindlessly think they need something, and buy it, without question.

Expert marketer Mitch Courtenary is asked by his company President to come up with an ultimate plan. Encourage flocks of humans to travel to Venus, to colonize the planet. The challenge is that Venus is a barren wasteland of a planet, and it will be an uncomfortable life there. For a skilled marketing executive of course, this is all in a day’s work.

However, when competition comes to Mitch from within and outside the company, he starts to see how humans really live, and he must decide what he will do, both for himself, and for others.

Book Review:

This novel is a classic piece of dystopian literature, and though it was written in the early 1950s, it mainly stands the test of time. The novel has some issues with sexism and gender roles that one wouldn’t expect today, and that felt clunky and out of place. However, other than that, this novel does a great job of predicting a world that feels very possible, in our age of consumerism and capitalism. In fact, in some ways one can see a reflection of 2017 society in this novel, at least on some level. The authors have done a good job of predicting what the future looks like now, and what it may look like in the future.

The novel has an interesting plot which takes us from the corporate world of skyscrapers to the dirty, filthy, mining world occupied by humans just trying to make it through life. Classism is showcased by the authors through the plot very successfully. The plot and the messages and warnings it tells are definitely the strengths of this novel. The scenes in urban America, Costa Rica, and the moon contrast nicely and keep the story moving. (Although the opening couple of chapters did feel a little bit slow.)

The characters are somewhat interesting, although the novel isn’t quite as strong in this area. Some of the characters feel undeveloped and there actions don’t always seem to make perfect sense to the reader. Although we have a strong sense of Mitch as the main character, the other characters often seem to be hanging in the background, yet they play various roles in the novel where it would be nice to have a little bit more understanding and substance to them.

Overall, the novel is a great dystopian read, even 65 years after its original publication. It has timely and valuable lessons for humanity, which makes the reading a valuable experience.

Overall: 3.5 stars out of 5 stars

Advertisements