Book Review – Watchmen – Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons

Watchmen

Facts:

Book: Watchmen
Author: Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons
Genre: Graphic Novel / Comic
Year of Release: 1986-1987
Read 384-page hardcover omnibus edition in May 2017.

Book Description:

It is 1985, and crime has increased in New York City, with the risk for WWIII and a nuclear conflict on everyone’s mind.  It is a worrying time in the world.  In this alternate history, Vietnam was won by the American forces, and Nixon retained power. With global forces pushing towards a dangerous war, retired superheroes are considering their role and what should be done. However, someone is out killing and framing these retired legends from the 1950s and 1960s. They must each determine who they reach out to, and how they react, to what is going on around them, and how it fits in with the wider global pressures.

Book Review:

This mid-1980s dark graphic novel was rated a Times top 100 English novel. Reading through the graphic novel, one can definitely see why it became a cult classic, and why it was the recipient of many awards. It is well-deserving of praise and admiration.

The graphic novel Watchmen has numerous themes contained within, many overt and many subtle, which requires re-reading and reflection. Writer Alan Moore has utilized great skill in writing a variety of political themes, and reflecting many of the concerns and issues that were felt leading up to the mid-1980s and date of publication. Moore and artist Dave Gibbons do a fabulous job translating political, cultural, and sexual themes into a world of intrigue, action, and drama.

Characters are developed and fleshed out nicely by Moore and Gibbons. The artwork is amazing and creative, and the structure of the story is unique. The graphic novel was structured in a new way, unlike comics that came before it. Furthermore, the decision to weave in supplementary material in the form of “made up” newspaper clippings, articles, and journals in between the chapters, as well as weaving in another related comic book tale about pirates within the main narrative of the superheroes, was a truly intriguing and complex structure. Although at times the additional comic book tale actually got in the way of following the exciting action and drama of the main story, which was distracting, it was true that it was very much connected in theme to what was going on, and thus was a unique storytelling tool.

The story is fast moving, and this graphic novel is hard to put down, as we see the various characters in this tale all with their own stories, but then all converging together as the plots come together. Even minor characters who aren’t vital to the main story come back as required, and at sometimes interesting times in the background.

The artwork is truly beautiful, with sequences on Mars and in NYC in the final couple of chapters very vivid and intense.

The final sequences in NYC are stark, but the conclusion of the story is very political, complex, and certainly not clear-cut. The fact we are left with a lot of moral ambiguity, and not a “happily ever after” ending, makes for a satisfying end to a strong graphic novel.

Overall: 4.5 stars out of 5 stars

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